Interview #32 - Preston Liew

Preston Liew is born and raised in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia. He finished his studies in Kuala Lumpur last year and recently had been hired as an assistant architect in Singapore. He started photography in mid-2014 with his group of friends, sharing the same level of enthusiasm on this field. 

Can you describe your style of photography?

Moody & mysterious with a pinch of fire.

Any photographers/other creatives that you follow?

Big names such as Hideaki Hamada, Aik Beng Chia, Che' Mad and local Malaysian photographers such as Husaini Mustapha, TTFGA, Roshan Menon, Happyfingers & Jseng Soh

 What camera or lens do you use to achieve your work?

At the moment, I only shoot with a Ricoh GRii and my iPhone 5S.

How the social media (e.g. Instagram) helps you in sharing your work?

Social media has definitely turned into a great platform for photographers and muses to reach out to one another and get the attention they need. But for now, I just want to share my passion to whoever's interested and enjoy life!

 What are your aesthetics in photography?

It depends on my mood. My work translates from what I feel during that particular moment. Some days, it's warm and vibrant and some days, it's moody and somber. Photographers are humans as well, we have our transitional period and we have our ups and downs.

Have you received any opportunities from presenting your work in the social media?

Never, but hopefully soon!

What’s your major goal in photography?

Ultimately, my goal is to be happy with what I'm doing and maybe one day, to be able to share more of my stories with friends and family who have supported me along the way.

Every photographer has their own struggle, for example, lack of creativity, not happy with their photos or self-doubt. How do you overcome those obstacles?

My everyday struggle would be time, passion and money.

Working a full-time job in the construction field definitely drains you out. The constant meetings with clients and consultants, amendments of design, revision of drawings, solving problems on site etc. would mean that we have to spend many hours to produce work that can meet the deadlines. It's definitely not a 9-5 job because it requires more than that - every inch of your passion and dedication needs to be present 24/7 including weekends!

If you have architecture friends, I'm sure you've seen hashtags like #architortured or #sleepisfortheweak. It's not easy to find time for shoots nowadays when I'm loaded with work. Work definitely kills my passion for photography.

Not much I could do to overcome this, because no work equals no food on the table! But as of now, I'll just appreciate whenever I have time to hit the streets for a few snaps!

What’s your one tip/advice to those who just started photography?

Stay humble, stay passionate and opportunities will come.

Do you have any preferences with your subjects?

Not really, but attitude and personality are the keys. Otherwise, it's just gonna be a bad time for all of us.

What is the one picture from your work that represents you as a photographer?

I guess it's this one - my mind is fogged up haha.

What is your process during a photo shoot/project? How do you plan? What do you do during the shoot?

Due to my time constraint, I am never fortunate enough to properly plan for shoot. But I do work out some basic ground rules with the muse such as ideas, locations and attires to know what we want to achieve. It's all about the power of collaboration!

It's pretty easy going during the shoot - realizing what we planned for and to find spots and angles to make the muse look good.

How’s your workflow in post-processing?

It's pretty basic, I don’t like to overcomplicate things. For mobile editing, I'll select the photos from my album then upload the photos to photo editing apps such as VSCO and Snapseed.

When I have a bunch of photos from shoots & travels, I'd dump them into Lightroom, apply free VSCO filter and delete the ones that don't look good.

Fun fact: I'll never spend more than 5 minutes on a photo, ain't got time for that!

What is your signature style that people can recognize your work?

To be honest, I've never heard someone saying "This style reminds me of your work" or "Wow! This is so Preston!". I guess I just haven't really developed a style yet. It's fine, it just means I have to shoot more!

Any music that you listen to lately? Movies that you just seen? Books that you read lately?

Been listening to the playlist Afternoon Acoustic by Spotify.

My favorite from the playlist would be Carry You by Novo Amor-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdzKagaiebo

 Any last words?

I know it sounds cliché, but live life to the fullest and enjoy the time spent with your family and friends. Life is so much more than just taking photographs.

You can find more of Preston's work below: 

Instagram

Facebook

Portfolio

셰나 by Neil Kenneth Sael

Neil:

This set was shot last January, where my model and K-Pop enthusiast friend, named Shanna, from Davao City was in vacation here in Metro Manila for four days.

We've been planning to have a portrait session for roughly a year since we didn't get to meet with her previous trips.

This set was supposed to be an experiment of colors but it turned out to be a staple of my succeeding night street portraits. 

The neon color scheme fitted her style really well. 

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Model: Shanna Palileo [@rblmood]

You can find more of Neil's work on Facebook and Instagram

Introduction by Jenko Cameradude

My name is Deevyesh and I'm a portrait photographer

Model: Gueen May [@gueenalexismay]

Photographer: Deevyesh [@jenko_cameradude]

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Deevyesh: This is Gueen reflecting her possibilities in her own way

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Deevyesh: I love this photo because she seems so lost in her thoughts

Deevyesh: She is noticing people - kids, adults, elders - how happy they are with their loved ones at that moment

Deevyesh: This shot is all about fashion and desires of Gueen's

Deevyesh: I took this shot recently caught my idea and i told Gueen to be relaxed and be lost in your own world. I love the contrast and the softness of the photo. It really speaks a lot of scars or pain that you've been through.

Kwartoserye by Jerferson Permejo

Jerferson is currently running a series of portraits of women, in a room or house with a very comfortable atmosphere called "KWARTOSERYE"

This series also complement his signature style of shooting portraits of women. He is constantly amazed with the raw & natural beauty of a woman and is the reason why he's found his passion in photography

Model: Shanne McBright Villa-Real [@shannevillareal]

Photographer: Jerferson Permejo [@jerf.k]

 

 

Desert in the City by Rune Kjelseth

Rune:

When I moved to cold and dark, wintery Oslo, Norway a month ago, I imagined it would be a bit different shooting after having spent some time in Asia.

Well, I was blown away by this location, a greenhouse in the middle of the city with a desert section.

Model: Nile Guiraud [@junglurbaine] 

Agency: Pholk Models & Talent [@pholk_agency]

You can find more of Rune's work on Instagram

Interview #31 - Amin Fitri

Amin Fitri is a photographer based in Terengganu, Malaysia and born in the 90s. His passion for photography comes from finding delight in capturing portraits of people. He also co-founded We Are Grafy in 2012.

You can find more of his work and We Are Grafy on:

Portfolio

Vimeo

Facebook

Instagram

What’s happening with you lately?

I just submitted my work for “Tanah Kita” exhibition organized by The Biddy's. The exhibition is mainly highlights the culture around us through our lens. Besides that, my team and I also released music video for a local band earlier this year. We feel that this project has put us outside our comfort zone.

What draws you into photography, specifically shooting portraits?

I like shooting portraits. I am fond of it because of the secret behind every smile, the tales of the moment and the emotion of the natural beauty shown by the subject. For every shoot that I did, there is always something different.

Do you remember your first ever shoot?

It was back when I was 16 years old, I went for a street outing with my school mates and realized how fun and exciting photography is.

How’s the photography scene over there in your perspective?

Only some people can accept my style of shooting.

What are your challenges being a photographer?

To constantly experiment, while maintaining my style in order to improve my artwork and to gather some audience here.

How does the environment you’re living in influence your photography?

Terengganu is surrounded by its magnificent nature that is hard to ignore. Therefore, I try to capture the emotion of the subject to match the nature’s beauty.

Do you have certain aesthetics or method of shooting?

I try to keep it minimal. Less is more, right?

What has drawn you to into shooting film?

The unique smell of film and the light leaks draw me close in using it. But I just shoot film as my hobby.

Do you think it is still relevant to shoot in film?

Sure, it is still relevant depending on the photographer’s style because sometimes, certain projects is more suitable in using film.

What is your go-to camera and film?

Fisheye No. 2 and Olympus mju II, with Color Negative 400 and Agfa Vista 400

In your opinion, what is the difference shooting film and digital?

Shooting film needs extra caution before clicking the shutter because we don’t want to waste the frames. Photographers who rarely use film need to experiment before hand in order to get used to the settings. With a digital camera, it’s easier to adapt in any conditions since we can easily meddle with the settings.

Describe how do your approach your work

I will do my research beforehand regarding the location and I will always review my previous artwork for improvement.

I will identify the advantage of the location such as its natural lighting. I will also try to make the model comfortable in front of the camera.

I will select a few photos and try to edit it first until I find the best result that I wanted to achieve. When I’m done, I will send the end result to my client.

What’s your post-processing like?

I would go for minor editing. I’ll adjust the brightness and contrast when necessary. I like my photos to be a little bit dark.

Do you have preferences for choosing subjects or models?

My personal favorite would be models who can create this 'resting bitch face' look.

Any other works or photographers that you follow?

Rahman Roslan, Nicoline Patricia Malina, Jacob Messex and Theo Gosselin

In what ways that camera gears or smartphone apps matter to you in producing the work?

I prefer camera gears that can be used in any kind of lighting. Since I do minor editing on my works, I rarely use smartphone apps.

Do you earn enough as a photographer?

So far I’m satisfied with it.

Who do you think are the audience of your work?

People who enjoy portraits that incorporate with nature.

How much you think people will value your work?

I feel a bit under appreciated and it’s probably due to less exposure of my artwork. I am still working on that.

How do you cope in getting the attention through social media or word of mouth?

I don’t let it get my way. I believe it’s a bonus that my artwork gets the attention but at the end of the day, I’m focusing on the quality of my work so I can deliver amazing output to my clients.

Any music that you listen to lately? Books that you read? Movies that you just watched recently?

I’m into Alina Baraz and I've recently watched Lion.

Anything that keeps you excited in the future?

I hope more opportunities will be coming my way, especially in music video projects. I would also like to be more involved in editorial photography in the future.

Any last words?

One of the quotes that I abide by is that if we want to make a change, we have to start it first. Anyway, I would like to take this opportunity to show my gratitude towards people who has inspired and assisted me in my life, especially my family and close friends. I am also humbled by the opportunity that We Shoot Souls has given me

[ed: Thanks]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feature: Jerferson Permejo

Jerferson Permejo is a self-taught photographer based in Manila.

He started to learn how to take photos over a year ago when he bought his camera actually for casual purposes. He is very eager to learn that he watched probably all tutorial videos on how to use a camera and how to edit the photos. He is very fond of shooting portraits and he finds shooting people really interesting because he can understand and can capture stories behind different eyes. It's just last year when he discovered his style of shooting. 

His signature is shooting portraits of women. He is also amazed with the raw and natural beauty of a woman and capturing it is his one of his discovered passion in life.

"I don’t have much reason why they’re my personal favorites. They’re just beautiful and amazing and it really appealed to my taste and aesthetics."

You can find more of Jerferson's work on Instagram and Facebook

Interview #30 - Ed Enclona

Ed Enclona is a 20 year old photographer from Manila, Philippines. He is colour blind. Before he started photography, he loved painting, both were discovered when he was in college. It's no surprise he incorporates his art into his portraits and fashion.

What’s happening with you lately?

Lately, I’m doing a lot of passion projects (well, that’s all I have). I’m really enjoying my time after graduating college through shoots. I’ve been also doing exhibits for a cause. I love immersing in the scene. It gives me a sense of fulfillment.

What draws you into photography, specifically shooting portraits?

First, I want to meet new people and be friends with them. And, also having such a creative bond will make them more memorable, right?  I also love sharing stories with people because I think that’s what makes us interesting - our stories.

Do you remember your first ever shoot?

Yes, my first shoot was with my best friend. She’s a pretty girl. Our shoot happened in our place. There was a river nearby and we just enjoy the place and capturing the moment.
 

How’s the photography scene over there in your perspective?

Here in Manila, Photography scene is huge and hyped. There are a lot of different creatives from street, events, portraits, fashion etc.  There are individuals who are very distinct in their genre and passionate enough to hone their skills. They always shoot in groups because camaraderie is important for us. Some help each other and some bash. All I can say that this scene here in the Philippines has its potential - very competitive in a way of being creative and hungry for creating new and fresh concepts.
 

What are your challenges being a photographer?

I’ve encountered so far are the fear of having no room for improvement and no new concepts to execute. As a true creative, you should start with something fresh or original.  I am afraid that I just feel I’m not improving, losing my potential and get jealous with others' works.

How does the environment you’re living in influence your photography? 

We all know that Philippines is a third world country and I’m living near the area where you can see the evidences. It fascinates me what a grungy and gritty place can do in my photographs’ vibe. I am always inspired by the people surrounding me. They are all passionate and keen in their work. It helps me to keep my fire burning and keep on shooting portraits and editorials. I love riding public transportation specially the buses. I enjoy the traffic. It gives me an ample amount of time to think, to know myself, discover more of my place and watch other people’s lives.

Do you have certain aesthetics or method of shooting?

I don’t have very specific method in shooting. I am a fan of guerilla shooting. It is like walking around the location and work on that spot. When shooting, I always keep in my mind that I should sell clothes and tell a story. That is how the fashion editorial works. I should make a statement and make the audience more curious about my work and let them ask questions.

What draws you into shooting fashion?

I always wanted to look unique and that makes me into fashion. I really love clothes and I’m dreaming that my background in art and my love for fashion will meet halfway. Fashion editorials catch my heart because you can do the art with the clothes and make a statement with it. I can consider the fashion editorial as a form of high art. It makes you think what’s with this and why it is. I really want to make more of it someday.

How’s the fashion scene over there?

I’m not in the fashion scene yet - the professional side of it. But all I can see is that the fashion is kinda fun and interesting. There are a lot of crazy minds that can make your mind blow. They help each other by mentoring others or by shooting together. They all want each a part of the team share the same spotlight. We cannot deny there are a lot of issues and bad things but what makes me excited to go with them is that they celebrate fashion and promote the Filipino fashion or talent in every possible way.  I wish with the next few months, years or moments I’m with them sharing the creativity and celebrating fashion. 

What are you incorporating when you do your fashion shoots?

I just keep in my mind that there should be my touch in every shoot. I just want to let them recognize that once they see a photo they can easily say that it was shot by me. I can’t say all my shots we’re made from scratch but all I can say is there will be my art, personality, my creativity and love for the art.

Describe how do your approach your work

I always consult my creativity.  I always ask myself what to show or what kind of fashion to shoot with. Once I’ve came up with the idea, I’ll look for inspirations from movies, textbooks, music or just travel around the city. And when I got the concept for the kind of shoot, I’ll go with the visuals to check what clothes I need, where to shoot, who will I shoot, and how will I frame the shoot. When there’s a chance that I need a team, I’ll look for people who want to collaborate with, from the makeup artist, model, assistant and stylist. I also consult and propose the concept, if it is solid enough and shoot worthy.  I also play the role of stylist sometimes because not all the time you have a team, you should know what their functions are. 

In the shooting day, I always orient and clarify the things we will do in the shoot. First, I let my model embrace the concept and feel the mood. Once he/she gets it, I slightly direct them to what I need in the frame. I always talk to my team especially with the models. Sometimes I also make jokes to lighten up our mood.  I also want to know more of my team and be friends with them so I do a lot of talking.

In selecting photos, I used Adobe Lightroom and select the possible photos and pre-enhance them. When I say pre-enhance - I color them, correct the shadows, highlights, contrasts etc.  Once I’m finished with selecting and pre-enhancing, I move to Adobe Photoshop to do the major job like retouching and color correcting.

What’s your post-processing like?

My post-processing varies according to the vibe of the shoot. What I usually do is to play with colors and textures to complement the vibe. I love desaturated photos. I love creating subtle meaning from layouts to colors. I’m kind of a person that has always something to say.

Do you have preferences for choosing subjects or models?

I only shot once with a foreigner but my preference are the locals.  I always want to support and promote what we have in our country. Other than that, I look for the models with the character, a unique character that I need for my shoots. They are very important. But I’m wishing to shoot more foreign faces - they have lots of things to teach me.

Any other works or photographers that you follow? 

I’m not good at remembering names but on their works.  I have two photographers that I stalk a lot here in the Philippines - Mark Nicdao and Shaira Luna.  Mark makes me want to try fashion.  He does fashion with substance and without much effort. Shaira is my thrift shop hero, she is good with that. I really love how she does the story-telling and laid back style of shooting plus with the distinct film vibe. 

Do you value quality or quantity?

Quality, of course.  I’d rather have one with a solid and perfect concept rather than a hundred of good shots but no substance.  Quality beats quantity in all aspects. The scene is not living for the numbers.

In what ways that camera gears or cellphone apps matter to you in producing the work?

It would be nice to have all the equipment a professional could have but to me, I think what really matters are the creative process. Gears and applications let you achieve them to perfection but a basic camera can do the same. Just know your gear and understand the basic principles then let yourself do the art.

Who do you think are the audience of your work?

I think the people value and respect the art the most. It’s not just the fashion. I’ve put my heart in my every work which they can see it through. I know they see the same.

How do you cope in getting the attention through social media or word of mouth?

I stay humble and give thanks to those people. I feel pressured and overwhelmed but I cannot let it through so I have to stay focus and feel happy. Keep the chill.

Any music that you listen to lately? Books that you read? Movies that you just watched recently?

I’m listening to The Lumineers and lately, Eden.  I also explore my taste in music and I try different genres. Try Yung Lean. I haven’t reading any novels lately. And there is also a book that I always recommend - The Secret by Rhonda Byrne for us to keep on the track.

I really love Christopher Nolan's films. I love films that make me think. 

Anything that keeps you excited in the future?

I will be trying to contribute for magazines. I’ll be doing a lot of collaborative works  during this first quarter of 2017 and continue my revamped collection for MAED and hopefully release an editorial with it. Portraiture-wise, I’ll be having an exhibit with my photographer friends in the south. I’m really excited to see what is coming this 2017. Hopefully, there will be some gigs and features.

Any last words?

Thank you for this Interview! I really enjoyed it. It makes me think of myself again. I think I have matured in a lot ways. To all the aspiring photographers, just keep on shooting and make yourself more original. Art and heart - keep that in mind.

You can find more of Ed's work below:

Portfolio

Facebook

Instagram

 

Feature: Jasmine Abdullah

This week's feature comes from Jasmine Abdullah.

Taking place at an abandoned mansion somewhere in Malaysia, the location provides a sombre ambience. The model exhibits a sensual, yet melancholic aura in these images. Jasmine then balances these images with a desaturated, brownish green tone. 

You can find more of her work on Instagram

Model: Thaneessha Leanna (@thaneessha)

Favourite Five 020 - Ed Enclona

Ed Enclona is a 20-year old, colour blind artist & an aspiring photographer based in Manila, Philippines. He graduated in Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in advertising. He enjoys painting and being a student leader. He also does the styling for the majority of his shoots.

Below is his Favourite Five

Ed: "This photo represents my aesthetic. As well as photographing the shoot, I was also the stylist for this one. What I achieved on this shoot is the capability of multitasking and doing two roles to achieve what I have in mind."

Ed: "I often shoot grunge streetwear fashion which makes it a challenge for me when shooting with a different theme. On this photo, I tried to lighten up the vibe by picking an outfit in between chic and streetwear. It was a challenge but I was ready to see what I’m capable of doing."

Ed: "This photo set isn't just photos - it's a statement. Entitled "OFF", it is an overall characterization of the impact I want to express, despite of breaking away from the standards or norms of their aesthetic, the clothes and over all fashion styling can still be editorial worthy. Thus, showcasing my capabilities as a rising creative."

Ed: "This photo is one of my favorite because the moment where I faced my biggest fear. A studio shoot. As a first timer, I did not have any clue on how to work with multiple models. I was proud when we called it a wrap. I nailed the layouts and created this set with pure substance."

Ed: "I got the concept for this photo from the movie ‘Equals’. The way this photo brings fashion and art in between, the very subtle effect and a layout that’s almost more of a painting makes fall in love with this photo over and over again."

You can find more of Ed's work on Instagram , his Facebook page and Behance

ISSUE 003

For the previous two issues, I’ve approached several photographers to contribute their work for the magazine.

For the next issue, 003, I’ve decided to make it an open field. This is going to be a collaborative effort together with you.

If you are a photographer (any other creatives are fine as well) and super interested to be in this issue, here’s what I need from you:

  1. Tell us what is your feature. Describe your set of photos.
  2. Submit 5-6 photos that relates to your feature to weshootsouls@gmail.com  [Photos with 72 dpi are good enough] 
  3. Include your name and Instagram account (or your website). If you use a model, include his/her name and his/her Instagram account

The deadline is 28 February 2017

Don’t forget to tell others and I’m looking forward for your submissions.

Ezra (We Shoot Souls)

Interview #30 - Kix Navidad

Kix Navidad is a portrait and event photographer from Cavite, Philippines. He is also a singer/songwriter and he claims himself as an orphan drifting in the cruel world

You can find more of Kix's work in the following below:

Portfolio 

Facebook

Instagram

What’s happening with you lately?

I have recently worked with our photography group’s anniversary in Cavite. It was quite successful and we have invited great photographers from the Metro and had a fashion shoot with our best models in an excellent location. It was a photographer’s heaven and I’m glad I was part of the planning.

What draws you into photography, specifically shooting portraits?

For me, it’s actually the people. I like capturing moments in the life of my subjects and making sure that they learn something along the process of making the photo. I love creating portraits and seeing their reaction to it. I enjoy stories of both the models and photographers and people I meet along the way.

Do you remember your first ever shoot?

Yes, it was with my cousin who dreams to be a model and that led to me shooting more. And I still remember my first ever shoot with a non-relative. That was very special.

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How’s the photography scene over there in your perspective?

Photography in my area is quite challenging especially me being an events photographer. The competition is fierce and new photographers are delving into events more and more. Being that the profit is alluring, so I have to be on top of my game and never slack off. But it’s still great! I have met quite a lot of photographers that became my friends after I’ve worked with them.

What are your challenges being a photographer?

A lot. But I face them one at a time. Primarily funds on better gear, shoot costs etc. But I make the most of what I have. I believe that is what makes my photos special. I make them with minimal budget and simple gears. I love the challenge of making a good photo out of any available location and ambient light. Imagine if I have the means of having better gear and locations. That keeps me excited.

How does the environment you’re living in influence your photography?

It affects my moods and that influences the output I’m producing. Since I don’t have a lot. I work with what I have and anything readily available. It is also great that I have good photographer and model friends that I can tap into whenever they are free. The Philippine government does not support most of its talents and overlook photographers as artists that need help since it cannot help itself. So, we make groups locally through social media and we help each other in the craft that we love.

Do you have certain aesthetics or method of shooting?

I actually am not fond of technicalities. As long as the output is great it’s fine. I just shoot in RAW, use ambient light at any time of the day, make use of what is available at the location. No special methods or anything.

Describe how do your approach your work?

It starts with an idea, a photo, a movie or music that inspired me to create something. Then comes the planning, searching for the best model that fits the idea, preparing the dresses, props, the overall look, talking to people that will be involved in the shoot, setting a date that will be favorable to everyone and finding a good location.

At the day of the shoot, I make sure that they are all good and in the mood of creating something special. I mostly talk to my subjects, guiding them since I mostly work with non-professional models. Sharing them the idea so it comes across and understood by everyone from the makeup artist up to anyone assisting me. Then comes the fun part of shooting! I show my models the photos so they can see and adjust to make anything better and shoot some more. This makes it fun for them and produces better quality photos for me. I select the best photos, about four to five photos out of the lot and post them online where they can be viewed by everyone.

What’s your post-processing like?

It is quite simple, since I am only using Lightroom. But I need inspiration before doing anything and that takes a lot of time. I need to improve on this part but that’s how I do things. My mood sets what I produce creatively and hinders my ability to make quick edits. I am not satisfied by photos that do not have any part of me.

Do you have preferences for choosing subjects or models?

It depends on the shot I’m trying to achieve. Since most of my models are first-timers, I pick those that have potential in doing the looks and moods I am trying to portray. I prefer Asian looking models that have eyes that are sad, as most of my shoots are like that.

Any other works or photographers that you follow?

I follow Shaira Luna, Joed Barallas, SamAlive, Mehran Djoajan, SiuMing ST and Yen Baet 

Do you value quality or quantity?

I value quality over quantity. That is the reason why I have trouble in producing more outputs. Every photo I make is a part of me. I leave something behind each photo, my mood, my story and a part of me. Most of my models/clients do not understand this and want their photo instantly. I only give them the best of what I can do at the moment.

In what ways that camera gears or cellphone apps matter to you in producing the work?

It’s not the gears that make a photo that is why I focus more on the skills rather than the actual gear. I use apps in my phone for my mobile photography and for putting them out on social media.

Do you earn enough as a photographer?

For now, it’s not enough since I have people to support and I need to earn more. But I believe it would be, after a time investing in different endeavors related to photography.

Who do you think are the audience of your work?

Mostly creatives and my friends. I would love to meet my few followers since the start of my photography journey.

How much you think people will value your work?

I love receiving compliments of my work and how it influences other artists and new portrait photographers. I think most, if not, all my clients were satisfied by my work at the current time when I did their wedding or special occasions and value them more. This fuels me to do better and keeps me hungry to learn more.

How do you cope in getting the attention through social media or word of mouth?

I have just recently learnt promoting my work in Instagram and being more active in social and photography sites.

Any music that you listen to lately? Books that you read? Movies that you just watched recently?

I have been listening to Rico Blanco’s Dating Gawi. I haven’t read anything lately due to being busy with photo shoots, but I still remember seeing Heavenly Forest and The Liar and His Lover.

Anything that keeps you excited in the future?

Yes. I have plans for doing a high fashion shoot with a great stylist/designer. I need to improve my skills further and explore new things that push me forward as a photographer.

Any last words?

I would like everyone to support their favorite local photographers. A simple like, comment or share will do wonders for them. Message them privately and tell them how you like their work to keep them producing better photos. Dead artists don’t need the money.

Interview #29 - Jasmine Abdullah

Jasmine Abdullah is a super talented photographer from Malaysia. She started creating images at 13 years old. Her work has gained some recognition in Instagram, and recently featured in Pursuit of Portraits' account.

Tell us about yourself? 

Hi and hello! My name is Jasmine, and I love making portraits. I’m currently based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and I’ve been taking photographs, diving head first into this realm of visual creativity since I was gifted my first DSLR at the age of 13. Fast-forwarding life by 11 years and a 3-year hiatus recently from photography, here I am today. 

What’s happening with you lately?

Where do I even begin? I’ve just recently graduated and moved back home from Singapore and actually, starting work in a few short weeks. Though it’s been quite the roller-coaster ride making this transition, I’ve also been pretty busy getting creative with love, from behind the camera. From conceptual portraits, I do that pull on my heartstrings, all the way to fashion shows, lookbooks, weddings and family sessions. I’ve been keeping myself occupied most days. Channeling creative vibes to the fullest because you know, I’ll only have the weekends to do that soon!

What draws you into photography, specifically shooting portraits?

It wasn’t until recently that I really thought about what draws me into portraiture, and really, there are many things. I love every facet of it. There’s just something about seeing an idea or vision come to life, and becoming art. I especially love how we have the ability to make something, or maybe even a moment that’s so ordinary looks so peculiarly beautiful. Portraits allow us to share the way we look at things, or maybe even the world.

Do you remember your first ever shoot?

Yes! My mother recently reminded me that I actually had an album of photographs that I took when I was 13. Looking through those, the first actual series I did was make do. It was also the time I fell in love with black and white images.

How’s the photography scene over there in your perspective?

I’ve been following (and a fan, really) of works by several photographers from our neighboring country, Singapore, for the longest time and it wasn’t until recently that I discovered and even connected with like-minded creatives here, in Malaysia! All thanks to the social media. I'm so proud of the great works that many photographers here are producing, which I hope continue to inspire more budding photographers to step out of their comfort zone.

What are your challenges being a photographer?

1. Getting outreach. 

Portraits. What is it about them that makes it so easy to look at, but harder to appreciate? I love portraits, and I appreciate all of them. If you make portraits as well, you’d know what I mean. It’s sad that it’s always the things that are aesthetically pleasing that gets the most outreach. In actual fact, art was never meant to always look pretty, but instead, it’s supposed to be able to make you feel something. To give you butterflies, pull on your heartstrings and some, maybe even make you feel a little uncomfortable. I strive to tell stories in some of the images I create and the likes or views don’t really bother me. What matters to me is that people feel something upon seeing these images. That people resonate with them. That’s the challenge. 

2. The need to specialize. 

I’ve been told time and again that to be “successful”, I should specialize. Though that might be partly true, I look at photography as a spectrum, and there are many different “genres” that make up this spectrum. I’m not saying that we need to be great at all of it, but I think that we should be able to explore, and even pick up more than 1 facet to photography.  The challenge surfaces when potential clients write or call in, more than often highlighting the fact that I do so many things, but what’s my “specialization”.  It’s personally a challenge for me, but I’m more than happy keeping it this way.

How does the environment you’re living in influence your photography? 

Well, Malaysia does revolve around its socio-religious climate. Though many of us are all about freedom of expression, it does take a second (or days) to think about how much, can be too much. I’m all for celebrating individuality, sexuality, freedom and liberation. 

However, I’ve already had fellow photographers come up to me, pointing out that I like “extreme stuff” upon seeing my favorite series called Breaking Barriers X Joash , beautifully created with this dear friend and androgynous beauty. I agree to disagree on that statement. Yes, we try to make a difference, and maybe push the limits just a tad bit, but we still keep it tasteful, and respectful. I guess you could say I’m a little more thoughtful in what a put out there. Positive vibes, people!

Do you have certain aesthetics or method of shooting?

I’m drawn to moody images and tones but really, I adapt to any particular shoot. Aesthetics and methods vary from shoot to shoot, and I really enjoy trying new styles of producing a photo, especially in the post-processing phase. 

What draws you into shooting fashion?

Just a few months ago, I never thought I’d be shooting anything to do with fashion! It wasn’t until a dear friend, threw me into the fire. After going out on an image adventure together, we spoke about her career in fashion as a model and all of a sudden, she gets me a pass to this fashion show. I fell in love. One show lead to another, which then was followed by several lookbooks and here I am! Actually, if it wasn’t for that first fashion show, I don’t think I would have tapped onto it. I even landed my first job in a career path revolving around fashion (which will be revealed in due time)! 

How’s the fashion scene over there?

I think it’s really good! There are so many local and regional talented designers, and I’m blown away every time they showcase their work on the runway. It’s so crazy, and just like what I said about making portraits, fashion, too is art in itself! Shows are a way of expressing, and it’s a beautiful art form. I love the artistry that goes into designing, and I hope the scene here keeps expanding! 

What are you incorporating when you do your fashion shoots?

I try to capture moments that people often miss when it comes to taking photos, be it during a styled lookbook or off the runway. This includes movement, lots of it, and details because the details do matter. 

Describe how do your approach your work

Sometimes I’m methodological and other times, I wing it. Some of my favorites are completely spontaneous, and almost unplanned. When it’s an actual project, I do draw up mood boards, looking for visual inspiration on Tumblr, Pinterest and Instagram. When an idea I have in mind doesn’t have an existing sample, I tend to draw it out. In stick figures, though! I’m never very tactical, and I’m completely flexible and alright with it if the shoot goes in a totally different direction. Like I said, it’s a joint effort my subject has got to enjoy, and be in the moment. 

What’s your post-processing like?

I like to keep it quick, and simple. I’m an avid Lightroom user, and I love creating my own presets! I always save presets as I go along. It’s amazing what you can do once you stop relying to ready-made presets like VSCO! Nothing against it, though. I use purchased presets now and then for a quick fix but really, it’s rewarding when it’s my own preset I’m using.

Do you have preferences for choosing subjects or models?

Not at all! I love getting creative with people. I believe that a great image is created together, and it really is a joint effort. I love figuring out what complements that particular model or subject, and making sure they are comfortable in their element. I find that I learn the most from shooting people of different shapes, sizes, ethnicities and so on. But I do very much prefer natural-light portraits, and shooting outdoors! I’d hike for hours just to get to a location, so I’m pickier in regards to location more than anything. 

Any other works or photographers that you follow?

Many! If I listed them all here, it’s never going to end. I discover new favorites almost daily, So I guess checking out the follow list via Instagram would have to do. 

Do you value quality or quantity?

Quality, without a doubt. 

In what ways that camera gears or cellphone apps matter to you in producing the work?

I believe that you don’t need great gear to produce great images. I shot on my dinosaur-aged Nikon D40 for the longest time before switching, and some of my favorites were done using that camera. It all depends on what you do with it. I can’t say much about cellphone apps because I seldom edit on a smartphone, but I know that phones today has come a long way in terms of quality, too. Even Leica has been collaborating with phone brands, and that’s pretty awesome. 

Do you earn enough as a photographer?

I can’t really answer this question, solely because I’m not a full-time photographer. However, I won’t say that I couldn’t be earning more. If only people knew the time and effort we put in actually producing these images.

Who do you think are the audience of your work?

I really haven’t taken notice on that, but I know that other fellow creatives are part of them! It’s so nice how Instagram connects us all, and everyone’s supportive. I don’t have a specific target audience, though. 

How much you think people will value your work?

I believe that it’s very subjective. Different people have different aesthetic preferences, and it’s those who appreciate your eye that will value your work more than anyone else. 

How do you cope in getting the attention through social media or word of mouth?

I’m a firm believer in both social media and word of mouth. Either way, I’m just very glad that people do appreciate what I do!

Any music that you listen to lately? Books that you read? Movies that you just watched recently?

Looking at my most-played tracks on Spotify, it’s currently Frank Sinatra. I love to read. I have a mini-library in my room, and my favorite has got to be Harry Potter. Unsurprisingly, Fantastic Beasts & Where To Find Them is my current movie obsession.

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Anything that keeps you excited in the future?

2017 is just around the corner, and I’m just excited in what the year brings. I look forward to seeing work, photography, love and life progress.

Any last words?

Always trust the process. Keep shooting, editing, practicing and it’ll come. This applies to everything in life. 

 

You can find more of Jasmine's work below:

Website

Instagram

Facebook

 

 

 

 

Feature: Nina Eilisa

One of my goals for We Shoot Souls is to feature works exclusive to the site.

I'm more than excited that Nina Eilisa of ENVY Creatives, a super talented fashion photographer from the Philippines, was keen to showcase her set of images, taken recently in Hong Kong

Photographer: Nina Eilisa [@itsninaaeilisaa]

Model: Elis Strohhaecker [@elis_strohhaecker]

Nina:

"We shot this set walking around the bright and bustling streets of Mong Kong, Hong Kong. As much as I love shooting in studios, shooting outdoors in different locations has its own charm and unique experience. We shot during the night time but that was no problem with the neon lights and signboards that lit the streets"

Nina:

"We literally just walked around and stopped to shoot at any corner that we thought looked interesting. Shooting with just the model and myself, guerrilla-style, reminded me of the times I was just starting out as a photographer when I would shoot portraits without any hair, makeup or styling team"

Nina:

"It was quite a different yet fun experience and I am glad with the way the photos turned out; each photo is interesting and is definitely worth a thousand words"

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If you're interested to exclusively feature your work, leave your contact details here

Favourite Five 019 - Jonathan Gonzales

Jonathan Gonzalez is a photographer from the Philippines. He also works as a banker and a student. His photographs are interestingly monochromatic.

Check his Favourite Five below

Jonathan: This was from my first attempt at street portraiture with my friend in Recto, Manila. She was having a cigarette break in between our street shoot and I managed to get some candid ones that turned out to be one of my faves so far.

Jonathan: This was taken in Buendia, Manila. It is near to the place where I used to ride the jeepney going home. A pretty gritty area and got to include it with the whole photo.

Jonathan: This was taken from a recent shoot in Shibuya, Japan. I saw this particular tunnel on the Internet and stumbled upon it on the trip. I got to shoot there with a friend of mine working in Japan.

Jonathan: This was shot from the EDSA-Ayala bus terminal, one of the places I've wanted to shoot on. Luckily, I managed to pull this one off.

Jonathan: This was taken in Makati Avenue, one of the red light districts within the Metro. We knew it was going to rain before we went out to shoot, so we brought jackets just in case. The rain had a nice effect on the asphalt and reflected the neon lights of the area.

You can find him on his three Instagram accounts: one, two & three as well as on Flickr

 

Interview #28 - Harry Dunkerley

Harry Dunkerley is an artist and photographer from Bournemouth, England. His artwork which combines rich textures with intricate line work and graphical elements, often explores themes of place, belonging and human relationship with the natural world.

Tell us about yourself?

Hi, my name’s Harry and I am a conceptual and fine art photographer from the UK. The three things I love most in life are travelling, my wonderful family, and creating art any way that I can - music, photography, illustration - anything that allows me to connect with people and make sense of the world around me. With my photography I aim to portray to depict a moment of struggle or uncertainty on the cusp of resolution, using the medium of portraiture as a means of exploring one's own emotional states, memories and connections with the society in which we live.

What’s happening with you lately?

I’ve just moved down to the coast to begin my degree in Illustration at Arts University Bournemouth, which is really exciting. Being in a space with so many other like-minded creatives is something I’m really looking forward to - sharing ideas with one another and entering such a new environment is no doubt going to kickstart my creativity. Until my course starts I’ve been exploring the area and enjoying the last little bit of summer weather with ice creams on the beach!

What draws you into photography, specifically shooting portraits?

Photography to me is a remarkably performative art form - especially portraiture. I shoot as much for the experience of being outside with the camera, bringing to life these imagined narratives, as I do for the end result. In a way, it feels less like producing a piece of art and more like exploring, discovering, playing. With conceptual photography you’re taking the world in front of the lens and reshaping it into something new, condensing these familiar settings into static moments and imbuing them with a sense of mystery or wonder. It’s a form of escapism, really, of understanding the world by rearranging and framing it.

Do you remember your first ever shoot?

I think I picked up my first camera at the age of 7 or 8, but it was only a few years ago that I truly began to view photography as a means of expression and an art form in itself. Discovering the work of other portrait and fine art photographers online was a key factor in motivating me to think that much deeper about the medium. My first ‘shoot’ was probably about three years ago with a friend in my photography class - we headed out into a forest with bags full of tea candles and laid them all around him as if they were fireflies. Although I cringe at that photo now, I remember how pleased I was at the time, and how that feeling of achievement urged me to keep going.

How’s the photography scene over there in your perspective?

Now that I’m attending an arts university I feel as if there are a lot more opportunities to get involved in the wider photographic community than when I was at home. It definitely feels like there’s loads to explore in terms of arts and culture, lots of events and festivals to go to and so on. Apart from that, social media is obviously an incredible resource to connect with other photographers from so many different places, and that was a big thing in helping me develop and build a kind of online presence.

What are your challenges being a photographer?

Probably the majority of it comes from my own self-criticism - I do judge my work quite harshly, which is a good thing to do but you have to make sure it doesn’t inhibit your creative process. Of course the challenge of getting your name out there and maintaining an online following is a key aspect of building a career in any creative art, but I feel like that is more of an opportunity to develop than an obstacle to overcome. Working out your own visual style is another thing, but again, it’s all part of shooting and the satisfaction I get outweighs any of the difficulties that may arise.

How does the environment you’re living in influence your photography?

My work very much revolves around the natural world and our relationship to it as individuals. At home I’m so lucky to be able to walk out my back garden and have miles of unspoilt fields and forests to explore. The tranquility and solitude of those natural environments definitely works itself into my photographs, alongside other feelings, perhaps of melancholy or uncertainty - most human emotions seem to find their equivalent in nature. Besides this I’m very interested in politics, mental health, and the role of art and technology in our everyday lives. I sometimes feel that as a society we’re quite pessimistic by default, with so much exposure to media outlets, so I try to work a sense of optimism into my photos, even if they’re dealing with serious subjects.

Do you have certain aesthetics or method of shooting?

I would say my visual style typically includes quite a dark colour palette - blues, deep greens, greys - although that changes with the mood and the concept I’m trying to portray. At the moment I’m really into shooting wide angle, usually with a large depth of field. As much as I like shallower focus, I find that it can sometimes flatten a picture, especially if the surrounding environment is just as integral to the image’s meaning as the portrait itself. I’ve been told my photos also typically depict solitary figures, usually with the gaze directed away from the camera. What that symbolises I don’t know, but I’m sure there’s some hidden reason behind it somewhere!

Describe how do your approach your work?

So the first step for me is always putting pen to paper, sketching out a few basic ideas for each photo. Usually this is little more than a stick figure and vague scratchy outlines of props, but it helps me keep a record of ideas so I can come back to them when the time is right to go and shoot. Sometimes I’ll come back to a sketch a year later with the final element that completes the image, other times I’ll draw something out and go out and photograph it immediately.

For the shoot itself, I’ll usually just head out by myself with my camera gear and any props I might need. As I typically do self-portraits there’s little need to plan or arrange anything in advance. I do wonder what it looks like for passers-by to see me shooting - I will do almost anything to get a photograph! I’m sure when I get to doing larger shoots I will work in a more structured way, but at the moment I just go with the flow and see how things turn out there and then. Too much planning and I just won’t ever shoot anything!

What’s your post-processing like?

Although I typically use Photoshop to construct my images, I try to keep complex editing to a minimum. One key component of my process is stitching together several photographs to artificially expand the frame. Earlier on in my photographic journey I tended to use Photoshop as the primary means of communicating a message to the viewer, however these days I try to use it as a vehicle to enhance other elements of a piece, such as colour and composition. I find that when you allow the post processing to become the main focus of the image, the true meaning of the piece becomes diluted. Learning to portray a concept through the manipulation of light entering the camera, rather than the manipulation of pixels on a screen, has been one of the most important things in allowing me to develop my craft.

Do you have preferences for choosing subjects or models?

I’d like to start working with models for my photographs, as up until now I’ve mostly focused on self-portraiture, which understandably results in the images taking on at least a partially autobiographical nature. On the one hand doing things myself is easier because I know exactly what I’m trying to achieve, but I’d like to push out of that comfort zone and work with other people who will bring their own views and their creativity to the process.

Any other works or photographers that you follow?

I could list hundreds! One of my all-time favourite photographers is Gregory Crewdson - his masterful use of lighting and attention to detail is something I greatly admire, as well as the overarching sense of detachment and obscurity he is able to weave into such familiar settings. Another body of work that I keep coming back to is Evgenia Arbugaeva’s ‘Weatherman’. It’s about a lone meteorologist working deep in the Russian Arctic, miles from civilisation. The photographs are so evocative and convey such a powerful narrative, and I just find them utterly captivating. And of course I follow loads of fellow photographers and artists on places like Flickr and Facebook, all of whom consistently inspire me to continue creating and sharing.

Do you value quality or quantity?

Quality, undoubtedly. However, I’ve found that the most important component in ensuring high quality is making sure you create as often and as regularly as possible. The two go hand in hand, I think - without discipline, the quality of your output will inevitably drop.

In what ways that camera gears or cellphone apps matter to you in producing the work?

I wouldn't consider myself a gear head, no way. As long as I have a decent camera that does what I need it to as quickly and as easily as possible then I’m not too fussy! Of course when I’m shooting fine art work or for a particular purpose I’ll use an SLR, but I love that we have access to such a wide range of options in terms of apps and phone cameras, as each provides a different opportunity to create.

Do you earn enough as a photographer?

At the moment I’m mostly doing photography as a hobby - I earn more through my illustration work which I sell online as well as at local galleries and craft shows. I’m working towards a career in the creative arts - whether that’s as a photographer, illustrator, fine artist or combination of all of these I’m not sure yet!

Who do you think are the audience of your work?

I think a large portion of my audience are fellow photographers and photography enthusiasts, which is nice because it allows us all to support each other’s work and help each other progress. Naturally as a young photographer I think the themes I’m exploring are probably also somewhat more focused towards the experiences of my own generation, but I’d hope that there is an element of universality to my photos as well. I don’t really think too much about my ‘audience’ because you can sometimes get bogged down in trying to cater for a particular demographic, which takes you away from why you’re creating in the first place.

How much you think people will value your work? 

I would be really humbled if people were inspired to overcome obstacles in their own life as a result of my photographs, or to engage with a particular topic. Ultimately I think we make art in an effort to communicate and connect, and if I can achieve that even with one person then that means a lot. Of course, my photos are very personal as well so my primary purpose isn’t for popularity. I shoot for myself first and if others appreciate my work or relate to it then that makes it all the more worthwhile.

How do you cope in getting the attention through social media or word of mouth?

I think it’s just a case of putting yourself out there. I’m still young and quite early on in my photographic journey so I try not to focus too much on numbers or statistics - there’s plenty of time for that. The key thing I think is to be proactive and take all the opportunities that arise - keep building relationships and get involved in the photographic community that already exists on places like Instagram and Flickr. I’m always amazed at how wonderfully supportive people are and ultimately that is far more important than sheer numbers.

Any music that you listen to lately? Books that you read? Movies that you just watched recently?

I think I have about six different books on the go at the moment! I’ve been reading Murakami’s ‘The Wind Up Bird Chronicle’ recently, which is so wonderfully imaginative and surreal, and has provided me with a lot of inspiration for artwork. Hunting out new music has long been a love of mine - two vastly different artists I’ve been listening to lately are Gallant and The Japanese House. Each has a mesmerising ability to create atmosphere and evoke deep emotions in the listener, which I’ve been inspired to translate into my own photographic work.

Anything that keeps you excited in the future?

I have a long list of photo ideas to work my way through, which is always exciting. Having just moved to an entirely new place with so many new people to meet and a whole degree to get stuck into, I don’t think I’ll be running out of inspiration any time soon! I’m really enthusiastic about what the next few years will bring.

Any last words?

Find something you’re passionate about and that you want to say to the world, and do it. It doesn’t matter what everyone else is saying - your opinion is important and it deserves to be shared. And thank you for the interview. I have enjoyed it!

You can find more of Harry’s work and illustration below:

Portfolio 

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

Blog

 

Interview #27 - Kevin Brent Sanderson

Kevin Brent Sanderson is an aspiring fashion photographer, residing in Manila. If you haven't seen his Favourite Five, here it is.

How are you? 

I’m actually in a great place in my life right now. I feel like I’m on the right path to get to where I want. Equally as important is I’m getting there with the support of the people who mean the most to me.

What’s happening with you lately?

I just finished moving houses! It was quite a lot of work because prior to moving in the new house, we had to put up wallpaper, paint, etc. But yeah, it is also exciting since I get a new environment to shoot in.

What draws you into photography, specifically shooting portraits?

Everyone wants to leave a legacy behind. And I believe that strong photos can fulfil that want to be remembered. 

Do you remember your first ever shoot?

I do! It was for this class requirement back in 2012. It was a photo of one of my close friends smoking by a window. I didn’t know what I was doing back then but it was still pretty exciting.

How’s the photography scene over there in your perspective?

Everyone is helpful here. Or at least the photographers I know. They even do collaborations with one another in order to make shoots smoother. There’s a lot of passion and talent around here. It makes you stay on your toes and keep sharp.

What are your challenges being a photographer?

I’d love to have a stable team to work with. I usually shoot with my girlfriend, who also happens to be a photographer. But we are still short-handed when it comes to the production of the shoot. To find a consistent stylist and make-up artist with the same standard of excellence is the next challenge for me I believe.

In general I think another challenge is how to get your name out there. I’d still love to believe that excellent work will get you places. But unfortunately it’s a mixture of great photos and the network of people you know.

How does the environment you’re living in influence your photography? 

I always make do with what I have. There are so many spots around where you live but since you see it every day, it doesn’t appeal as much to you so you don’t think much of it.

Do you have certain aesthetics or method of shooting?

I want to end up shooting for magazines. So usually when I shoot I always have that in mind. That this layout should potentially look like it could end up in a magazine.

Describe how do your approach your work

I’ve been doing a lot of test shoots lately so I will talk about those. I look for models or respond to ones who inquire about a shoot on Instagram mostly. I shoot either during the daytime, or I do hard flash stuff in the evening. I decide which to do depending on the availability and location of the model.

When I meet the model I do my best to befriend her/him and try to establish comfort around each other. I believe that when you both have a common ground of comfort to work on things go smoother. I also have a playlist on Spotify that I always use when I shoot. It gets really awkward in my opinion if there is complete silence on set.

I send the photos via Google Drive. It’s really convenient for both parties in my opinion.

What’s your post-processing like?

I just use Photoshop actually. And the colour really depends on the mood of the photo. But when it comes to black and white, I do try to keep it consistent by keeping the blacks black and the whites white.

Do you have preferences for choosing subjects or models?

Not really. If someone looks interesting to me then I’d love to shoot them.

Any other works or photographers that you follow?

Mark Nicdao is a huge influence on my portraits. His work is what convinced me that fashion was the road I wanted to take with my photography. Then, there’s Nicco Santos. The way his photos looked so natural made me want to do the same. Lately I’ve been checking out a lot of Mario Testino’s works.

Do you value quality or quantity?

Quality, of course. I’d rather have one great shoot than have 10 subpar ones. Quality of work beats quantity when presenting your portfolio to companies as well.

In what ways that camera gears or cellphone apps matter to you in producing the work?

Photoshop is my bread and butter. I even have it on my phone. Now that there are Instagram stories, instead of capturing straight from Instagram, I use my phone camera then edit the photo in the mobile version of Photoshop. The photo looks a lot crisper that way.

My camera of 5 years actually gave up on me a week ago. It was a Canon 7D. I cried after letting the news sink in. I’ve gotten far with that camera. So it honestly felt like losing a friend. But yeah on a positive note, “full frame” here we come.

Do you earn enough as a photographer?

As of now, not really. But eventually I will.

Who do you think are the audience of your work?

I’m very honest with my photos. The way it looks and feels. I guess the people who value that appreciate my work the most. I often get the feedback that my photos are very classy. Which I appreciate since that is what I aim for.

How much you think people will value your work?

I seem to get consistent positive feedback from the people who matter to me. And I believe that’s enough for me to know that I’m on the right track.

How do you cope in getting the attention through social media or word of mouth?

It is all very humbling. But at the same time, I can’t let it get to my head. Complacency kills consistency.

Any music that you listen to lately? Books that you read? Movies that you just watched recently?

I’ve been listening to a lot of The White Stripes and Jack White. In contrast I’m also listening to Ta-ku and Mura Masa as well. 

The last book I read was one of Neil Gaiman’s. And that was a good 6 months ago.

I’m a huge DC fan. I actually grew up buying and reading the comics. Suicide Squad was okay. It entertained me enough for me not to dislike it.

Anything that keeps you excited in the future?

My girlfriend and I have our work exhibited in a gallery! She paints on my portraits. It’s our first solo exhibit and the love we’ve been getting for it is amazing.

I’m going to have my first shoot in the new house next week! I’m really looking forward to it. There are more things in the works as well. But I’d prefer to keep it to myself.

Any last words?

Thank you for this interview! It actually helped make me think about my process in a more solid way.

You can find more of his work in the following below:

Facebook

Instagram

Blog

Favourite Five 018 - Kevin Brent Sanderson

Kevin Brent Sanderson is a portrait photographer from the Philippines. I just love how he plays with the natural light and  lights it seamlessly well to the subjects. He strikes a balance of spontaneity and sexiness to his images.

He showcases most of his work on Instagram and Behance

Below is his following Favourite Five

Kevin: This was taken around 2 am in the city. We were walking around looking for interesting locations while everyone else was asleep. We had to do it around that time so that there weren’t that many people out on the street. This has been one of my favourite photos because of how thrilling it was to create.

Kevin: I just love the whole vibe of this photo. I believe it looks more interesting tilted like this. An excellent example of how breaking the rules benefit photos sometimes. It was also pretty spontaneous how it happened. I never liked taking photos of people with cigarettes because I found it cliché. But it just works really well in this one.

Kevin: I can get away with this photo because of her ballerina shoes. It’s the shoes that explains the pose. That’s what makes it so great at the same time.

Kevin: I love how subtly beautiful this photo is. It’s actually the last shoot I did before I moved in the house I’m staying in now so it’s got that sentimental vibe to me.

 

Kevin: I feel like this was the set that helped boost my career as a photographer. And yeah it is still one of my favourites even if it was done more than a year ago. The fact that a lot has changed during that time, yet I can still look at this and still love it speaks a lot. You can check out the rest of the photos in my Behance under the set called Gravity.